Thursday, September 20, 2007

PeerBox : File sharing goes mobile

The first P2P (Peer-to-Peer) generation was based on a client/server principle and a centralized file list. Napster is the most familiar example and one of the first tools any of us ever used for file sharing. But in a way Napster was also the trigger to the second P2P-Generation which was characterized mainly by decentralization.

The Decentralized file sharing generation came as a direct result of what eventually happened to Napster after encountering serious legal troubles. Yet, the new generation model has been adopted by both leading open source projects such as Gnutella and eMule/Kademlia and by commercial services such as Kazaa.

Third file sharing generation?

Yesterday I have been informed that might be taking its next step towards another major evolution change: Social network and mobile Peer-to-Peer file sharing application PeerBox by Nareos, have just announced their beta version platform went through the 100K unique user line in more than 170 countries overall.

PeerBox Home screen

Who knows? Maybe some day, in retrospective view, this may be remembered as a milestone in the way to the third file sharing generation, when people have started sharing files using their mobile phones. Does anyone doubt that the day is not far when people would get freaked out when their mobile P2P will stop functioning one day because of lack of supernodes as happened to millions of Skype users just recently?

Tied to a computer

Claiming to be the first true Peer-to-Peer service for mobile phones, PeerBox Mobile is a peer-to-peer file sharing service for your mobile phone. With PeerBox, you can share your videos and pictures with others network members directly from your mobile phone. You can also send messages to friends and watch their videos and pictures. Unfortunately at the moment PeerBox only supports phones manufactured by Nokia, Sony Ericsson, Panasonic, Samsung and Lenovo.

PeerBox My Downloads screen

According to Alexander Lazovsky, CEO of Nareos, successful viral marketing triggered quick word of mouth distribution and high adoption rate of PeerBox, proving that "people are looking for a way to socialize, create and share content without being tied to a computer.”

According to Wikipedia, file sharing is "the practice of making files available for other users to download over the Internet and smaller networks" but also say "most people who engage in file sharing are also downloading files that other users share. Usually these two activities are linked together."


  1. I'm pretty careful when it comes to file sharing -- most of the time I just get files from people I know personally.

  2. That might be a smart strategy in some cases Al, but I think a good updated anti virus software used to scan all files coming from the sharing pipe can be pretty safe while still allowing free data transfer.


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